Archive for the 'Communication' Category

Beyond 9/11 photographed by Marco Grob wins Emmy

Marco Grob (born in Olten Switzerland, 10′ from where I grew up) has won an Emmy together with TIME for the stunning portraits of “Beyond 9/11 Portraits of Resilience” in the category “New Approaches to News and Documentary Programming”

The The 9/11: Portraits of Resilience project also appeared as a special issue, a film documentary, a book and a photo exhibition. But the website is “perhaps the purest expression of what we attempted to accomplish,” said TIME Managing Editor Rick Stengel. “It’s very gratifying that it was recognized and I want to first of all pay tribute to the brave men and women who suffered through the terrible events of 9/11 and then shared their stories with us and the world.”

(via TIME)

5 Things Every Presenter Should Know About People, Animated

This video already shows how one should present. It might be more work to think of visuals to be put on slides but worth the effort as people consume better what you say / the message is clearer. Just watch this video by Dr. Susan Weinshenk. I wish I could draw as awesome though..

  1. People learn best in 20-minute chunks. There must be a reason for the successful TED-sized talk format.
  2. Multiple sensory channels compete. During a talk, you engage both the auditory and visual channels — because we’re visual creatures and the visual channel trumps the auditory, make sure your slides don’t require people to read much or otherwise distract from the talk.
  3. What you say is only one part of your presentation. Paralinguistics explores how information is communicated beyond words — be aware the audience is responding to your body language and tone. Record yourself presenting to get a feel for those and adjust accordingly.
  4. If you want people to act, you have to call them to action. At the end of your presentation, be very specific about exactly what you would like your audience to do.
  5. People imitate your emotions and feel your feelings. If you’re passionate about your topic, this excitement will be contagious for the audience. Don’t hold back.

(via brainpickings.org)

The future of mobile

Presentation of Business Insider

9 things Lady Gaga can teach us about community management

This week, Lady Gaga became the first person to exceed 20m followers on Twitter.

These are huge numbers, but volume rarely means anything on its own. The interesting point here is that this community really are her ‘followers’ – in namesake and in the way they respond to her.

They are more loyal than a brand could ever dream of, but there are some lessons that we can all take on board and implement when trying to build a community either online or off.

  1. Look at existing behavior and run with it
    One of the biggest mistakes brands make when entering into the world of social media is a lack of response. Whether we’re talking about social customer service, or just engaging with people who love your brand;  it’s very hard to do either well without there being some kind of interaction.
  2. Invest and incentives
    Not only has she personally invested in Backplane, a technology-based community platform, but she also uses Fancorps – another platform from which she leverages a street team of over 25,000. Fancorps incentivises people to share the word of Gaga both online and offline, people are rewarded with points to be used against tracks or albums, tickets, collateral, virtual gifts and more.
  3. Show your flaws
    Instead of taking this popularity, and shying away from it, keeping things behind closed doors – she’s embraced it and flung open the doors. There are messages from her bedroom, videos shot backstage, interviews where she’ll open up about being scared about performing. The whole shebang.  
  4. She’s true to her brand
    It might be ever-changing, chameleon style, but Gaga’s brand knows itself like no other. It know its stance on equality, sexuality, friendship and more. These might not be issues that every brand needs to consider, but working out what your social voice is.  
  5. Change
    Keeping people engaged for longer periods of time means exciting them. Sadly, attention spans are much shorter than they used to be, and so there’s a need to create a richer content plan now more than ever.
  6. Authenticity
    There are no holds barred with Gaga. What you see is what you get, she’s the one doing the talking.  You can tell this by the candid images and videos, to the way she talks online. She’s the one running the show.
  7. Targeting like-minded people
    To properly build a community, a scattergun approach will not work. There are too many forums, networks, games and apps for people to get involved with, and suck up their time.For years, the benefits of mass-niche communities have been shouted from the rooftops, but now, this is tipped to be the ‘future’ of networked society. 
  8. Gratitude
    Without a doubt, the power of Gaga is her fans. Her crazy, loyal, would-do-anything-to-support-her fans. She knows that, and she tells them regularly. It’s the most simple aspect of her community management, it’s free and it takes no time at all.
  9. Collaboration
    Co-creation and collaboration is the name of the game at the moment. Well, it has been for a while really, but it’s matured enough to be of real use to a brand. Nokia’s just announced that it will centre a large of its international marketing strategy around this, just to show you how it’s evolved as a concept.

See the full article on econsultancy.com

KONY 2012

One man can really make a difference to change the world.

The Story behind the ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ poster

(via thecoolhunter.net)

100 years of Swiss graphic design

This expo offers more than just the Helvetica font and is definitely worth a visit if you are in Zurich. – still runs until 3 June 2012.

Swiss graphic design – one of the country’s leading products – is encountered everywhere. While a single individual style cannot be identified, a certain common approach is evident. This is revealed in the striking awareness of quality in the works, in the skilled handcraft, as well as in the precision and reduction to essentials. Graphic design from Switzerland reflects both international trends and local qualities; irony and wit are its constant companions. The view of one hundred years of graphic design shows both the diversity of current visual communication as well as the fine lines of tradition that connect works from different epochs. Alongside the poster and smaller items of printed matter, the show also includes outstanding examples from advertising and information graphics, typography, signage or book design, design objects that relate to graphic design, as well as selected striking advertising spots, and works for web design. Many objects come from the museum’s own collection.


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