Archive for July, 2012

Google handwrite search

Pretty awesome and recognizes handwriting amazingly accurate. Handwrite lets you write your search right on the Google homepage.

I love typography

If you do too, you will love the website we love typography. Type in a keyword on the top right and it will give you type related content to it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(via swissmiss)

Chic Engine Helps You Find That Dress You Saw on Pinterest

It is not new but the story behind impresses me in terms of idea creation and also it represents new ways how information can be found closer to the real-life search approach: “I saw this white dress the other night, and want to get results for a this type of white dress and not just a dress which has the same shape.” Jonathan Allen wrote about Chic Engine on searchenginwatch.com:

What does breast cancer screening have to do with fashion? More than rubber bracelets or ribbon broaches.

Adrian Rosebrock, from Catonsville, Maryland, has put into action insights from his day job as a developer at the National Cancer Institute unit to make a visual search engine.

Working in the breast cancer screening unit, Rosebrock has been developing metrics to detect cancer in images and taking those learnings about computer ‘vision’, namely histology, and applied it to the problem of shape and color in visual search in the fashion vertical.

His project, Chic Engine, matches the shape and color of any image led query you input, either via a image file upload or a hosted image URL – provided you are looking for clothing matches. Currently the index of returned products comes mainly from ShopStyle but what is available so far is an impressive demonstration of how visual search could be something to look out for.

Full article

Life is too short to be busy

“A ‘Busy’ Trap” is a great article for the NYT by Tim Kreider which everyone should read.

Brecht Vandenbroucke

[…] It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. And the stock response is a kind of congratulation: “That’s a good problem to have,” or “Better than the opposite.”

[…] Busyness serves as a kind of existential reassurance, a hedge against emptiness; obviously your life cannot possibly be silly or trivial or meaningless if you are so busy, completely booked, in demand every hour of the day.

[…] Idleness is not just a vacation, an indulgence or a vice; it is as indispensable to the brain as vitamin D is to the body, and deprived of it we suffer a mental affliction as disfiguring as rickets. The space and quiet that idleness provides is a necessary condition for standing back from life and seeing it whole, for making unexpected connections and waiting for the wild summer lightning strikes of inspiration — it is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done.

(via nytimes.com)


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